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You are watching: How many shovels of sand per bag of mortar


Ok dumb question time. As some of you may know Im still new to the brick laying trade. So far I have only done some small projects and heve been using the premixed morter. I now have a project that would be better using some sand and cement and mixing my own morter. What I need to know is what is the best mix ratio. I have looked around the internet and found a few charts that only confuse me. So I figure that I had better consult the all knowing wise masters on this one. Thanks in advance Smitty
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Ahh, mortar mix design, my favorite subject. The answer is that you have to use the proper mix for what you are laying, where you are laying it and when.The mix that you can"t usually go wrong with is 1-1-3, portland-type S lime-masonry sand. Workable, good bond strength and enough lime to promote autogenous healing.The important thing to remember is that the proportions are by volume. Portland cement is bagged in a 1 CuFt bag (94#), as is lime (50#). A five gallon bucket filled to the top ring (not the top of the bucket) is also 1 CuFt.
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ok ...Standard red brick - on top of concrete - and today (winter/spring. Wet no freeze)correct me if I misunderstand this ...one bag (1 cu ft.) 94# portland type "S" cementone bag (1 cu ft.) 50# lime3 cu ft masonry sand (3 buckets filled to first ring)OR (?)1 shovel cement 1 shovel lime3 shovels sand(My mixer is only a 2 cu ft.)Correct???
mixi tell my hands to mix it:10 shovels(square point and full)sand, one bag mason cement,8 shovels of sand.so you end up with 18 sands and one bag of mason.if i am laying artifical stone i use 1 or 2 less sands and add one shovel portland.if we are mixing grout 18 sands,bag of portland,18 sands.if the miz is too wet,on mason you can add 3 shovels sand to one shovel mason.4 sand to 1 portland.
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What do you want.. a measuring cup? And type S is for high compression strenght and has a high bond. I usually dont use type S for normal home construction. And Im only assuming thats what your doing. I usually use type N. I mix it generally add water, 10 sand, the bag of mortar, then generally I add anywhere from 8-10 more sand and adjust the water to get consistancy as needed. Different companies seem to take different amounts of water to get the same constistancy mud you get from the bag of mortar and 18-20 shovels of sand. ( I use a spade in my sandpiles)And like stacker said for fake stone. I usually go less sand while lickin em and stickin em to get it "tackier".

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1 gallon or 5 gallon buckets work fine. Type N is fine for pretty much anything, even structural CMU, but I still prefer Type S for everything but soft stone and wood fired brick.It doesn"t take a lot of difference in the amount of sand to change the color, even without integral color.
Have tried to stay out of this, but do want to add a few thoughts.I have seen masons use all sorts of mixes---any thing from heavy lime to portland ratios to pure portland and sand. Worked on one job where they used a triple beam analytical scale to proportion everything, but then that entire job was kind of strange Over a 30 year time frame I found that type n , no lime, and a little portland worked well for me. Then when the type s started showing up, I began to use it without adding that little bit of portland. A nice workable mix . Sand would always be in a 3-1 ratio more or less, but again, I found that different sand sources would effect that too. Home owner got us some "sugar sand" to work with over in east Texas once, and it took a bag of type s, 1/2 bag portland, and about 40 shovels of sand just to make a decent wheelbarrow of mud. My normal sand source would give me two decent wheelbarrows from a bag of type s and around 20 shovels sand. I only use lime and portland if there isn"t any masonry cement available.Now having said all that-- the ratio is generally in the 3 sand to 1 cement range, but in my opinion, it"s the feel of the mud on the trowel that is the most critical component of any mix, and that is where a good mud man can make a crew, or a poor one will keep the masons aggravated all day long.Just my 2 cents about mud.JVC